Crandall Challenge

WHARTON GRADUATE EMERITUS SOCIETY

Crandall Challenge

THE WHARTON GRADUATE EMERITUS SOCIETY

The Crandall Challenge to WGES Members

The Crandall Challenge Committee is committed to the principle of active involvement by WGES members in business and community affairs at whatever level to effect change where change is needed and to support the next generation of leaders where such support is needed to keep our institutions strong and viable.

We believe that active involvement is good for each WGES member; it is good for the Wharton School community; it is good for our country and it is good for the international community.

Our message is clear: Stay involved!

After collecting input from all members of the Steering Committee, The Crandall Challenge Committee will develop a set of action steps to encourage all WGES members to spread our message of active involvement.

Co-Chairs:
McClain Gordon, WG’73
John Hendricks, WG’66

Crandall Challenge 2023

WGES members can begin thinking about submitting nominations for the Crandall Challenge Citations that will be awarded in May 2023.

McClain Gordon and John Hendricks, Chair and Vice-Chair of the WGES Crandall Committee,  announced that nominations for the Citation will be accepted during January 2023 and February 2023.  Those receiving the Citations will be selected by March 31, 2023.

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    How to Get Started Helping Others

    Thinking about volunteering but haven’t made up your mind exactly as to what or where? Maybe we can help. Several simple steps can make the path clearer, easier, and more specific to your needs and interests. Here are some of them:

    • Narrow the field: What areas of human endeavor interest you most? From aardvarks to zymurgy, many things happening in life need attention, help and betterment. Whether it’s tennis, math, cooking, plant life, poetry – or anything else – volunteer groups most everywhere will welcome your help. Go where your heart and head may lead you.
    • Consider time: Estimate the hours you’d be willing to donate to volunteer activity in a month. Even an amount not likely to change your lifestyle still affects your schedule. Whether two or twenty, it should be a committed period you enjoy, so you and your working partners get the greatest benefit. Also include necessary travel time.
    • Get help: There are multiple sources ready to supply future direction. If you have a computer, several national websites offer help. Several states also have websites devoted to helping you reach volunteer organizations in your region and city.

    Here are three national websites and two state websites devoted to helping citizens find the right place to lend a hand:

    With or without a computer, the first-rate source for volunteering direction is your library’s Reference Librarian. These professionals usually know what’s happening locally and regionally, and will help you get connected with the right organization.

    Good luck with your search. Let us know if we can help further to get things under way.

    The Crandall Committee of WGES

    Recipients of the 2022 Crandall Challenge Citation

    The Wharton Graduate Emeritus Society honored Crandall Challenge Citation recipients for the years 2020, 2021 and 2022 at its annual Reunion dinner on Saturday night May 14, 2022. Attending were members of the 40th, 45th and 50th Reunion classes as well as other Emeritus Wharton MBA’s.

    The Covid-19 pandemic prevented these ceremonies from being held in 2020 and 2021. Rather than having an online presentation using Zoom during those years, it was decided to have a once in a lifetime multi-year congregation of Crandall recipients in Philadelphia when it was next permissible.

    Our event was held in the top floor rooms of the downtown Lowes Hotel where glass walls permitted far reaching views of the nighttime Philadelphia skyline as hors d’oeuvres were passed during an extended cocktail and social hour. Attendees had ample time to meet and have discussions with the Crandall Citation recipients and make new friends among Emeritus and
    other class attendees.

    After opening remarks, Crandall Chairman McClain Gordon WG’73 called to the stage the first Crandall Citation recipient, from the year 2020. McClain read a summary of the recipient’s projects and accomplishments during the period post 45 years after graduation and presented the bound Crandall Citation and an engraved Chalice to the recipient. Recipients were honored from 2020 and 2021 and 2022.

    The  Crandall Challenge CITATION AWARDS Honor Roll

    This honor roll is in recognition of the large number of Wharton Graduate Emeritus Society members who draw upon the skills, knowledge and talents they acquired at Wharton Graduate to make significant contributions to the improvement of their communities and to the quality of life of our nation through continuous volunteer endeavors.

    Crandall Citation Awards went to:

    In 2022

    In 2022 Robert Crawford, WG’63 (Lake Forest, IL)

    Robert founded Neighborhood Entrepreneurship Lab (NEL) in Chicago in 2017.  Paired with non-profit lender, NEL works with entrepreneurs from disadvantaged communities providing mentoring, business plan awards, capital.  Currently there are  20 entrepreneurs in program.

    The Neighborhood Entrepreneurship Lab (NEL) provides grants for entre startups that focuses on disadvantaged communities.  It partners with the Chicago Community Trust. Bob formed Neighborhood Entrepreneurship Lab in 2018.  The organization identifies entrepreneurs in disadvantaged communities in Chicago and provides coaching, connections and capital.  In year 1 NEL had 1 entrepreneur.  In years 1 thru 4 there have been a total of 21 NEL alums.  In year 5 there are 20 entrepreneurs in this year’s class!

    The NEL program was developed in partnership with The Chicago Community Trust and lead donor, Bob Crawford, to provide capital, coaching, and collaboration to entrepreneurs poised for growth. The program pairs small business owners with investors, advisors and strategists who provide intensive assistance as well as introductions to influential contacts within their personal networks. In addition, each entrepreneur receives a $20,000 grant to grow their business.

    George ‘Chip’ Fisher IV WG’64

    Chip’s business career has centered on Sun Valley ID and its development.  Previous work chairing Idaho efforts supporting the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City led to his being chosen to financially turn around the Special Olympics Winter Games in 2009, earning a surplus.  He subsequently chaired the R4 Alliance, serving 175,000 servicemen with disabilities, growing from 8 founding members to 58 Programs of Excellence serving our veterans

    For over 50 years Chip has served a board member for multiple not for profit organizations in Sun Valley, Idaho to create a cradle to rest upon. For to Chip’s mind, the lure of Sun Valley lies within the wellbeing of its not for profits be them hospitals, educational institutions, art centers or ski educational programs. In the 1990’s-2020’s Chip was asked by four different Idaho Governor’s to participate and help lead Idaho’s efforts to reframe the State’s educational system. The second and third Governor had Chip to Chairing the Idaho Olympic Commission to assist Utah in staging the Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City in 2002. A fourth Governor asked Chip to turn around a failing Organizing Committee that was to host the 2009 Special Olympic World Games in 2009, which he did and became the one the largest  Special Olympic Winter Game to this day and the first to earn a surplus.

    In 2021

    Malcolm Bund, WG’74 (San Diego, CA)

    My private equity group bought Precision Alternator and Starter.  Thereafter I started a private/public sector non-profit to provide transportation to the needy, Vehicles for Change (VFC).  VFC has been a home run.  Today, 22 years after inception in 1998, we have provided over 8000 vehicles to the needy, who have achieved 30% higher wages as a result of having their own transportation.  In addition VFC trains released prisoners to become auto mechanics through training and ASE certification.  Since 2015 VFC has placed 150 mechanics in gainful employment with several graduates earning six figures.  Key Advisor to Kitchens for Good (KFG), which trains ex-cons to work in the food service industry.  Trainees take donated commodities and prepare meals donated to the homeless and the disadvantaged.

    David Nevins, WG’70 (State College, PA)

    Co-founded the Bridge Alliance in 2014 of which I am now the chairman of the board.  The Bridge Alliance has had remarkable growth and is now an alliance of over 100 organizations all working to create the healthy self-governance that is promised in our founding documents and so badly needed in our country.  The work of the Bridge Alliance the last 5 years is now recognized and referenced as a critical component and coalition….a cross-partisan constituency of 11+ million Americans who are dedicated to renewing our democracy.

    In 2020

    Reid Becker, WG’74. (Zirconia, NC)

    Reid’s career  included  starting his own medical diagnostic business.  When he  ‘retired’ , he become part of a STEAM Tech Team, volunteers who work to support  Science, Technology, Engineering Art and Math programs in the schools located in the Greenville, SC metro area.  The volunteers are retired professionals active in the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute of Furman University.    The programs include: E-Nable Prosthetic Hands , Vex competition robotics, Biomolecules, Quadcopters and Drones 3-D printing and designs.  “E-Nable” is a worldwide movement of  tinkerers, engineers, 3D print enthusiasts, occupational therapists, university professors, designers, parents, families, artists, students, teachers and people who just want to make a difference by printing on 3D printers hands that they give for free to children all over the world.  Over 700 hands were created by over 3200 volunteers around the globe.

    Filemon Berba, WG’64 (Antipolo City, Philippines)

    Following his career in several Philippine companies that included electric and water public utilities, electronic and pharmaceutical industries, Filemon has devoted his retirement to the Philippine Foundation for Science and Technology (PFST). This Foundation, of which he was a founder, has the objective of creating a critical mass of young people exposed to science with the intent of preparing them for engineering and technological careers. As President and Chair of the PFST Board of Trustees, he has developed outreach programs that involve 400,000 Philippine high school students each year. They created the Philippine Science Centrum, the first interactive science museum in the country. Since the Philippines is an archipelago, they created 7 mobile exhibits that over the years have been visited by 7 million students and teachers. They have trained 6000 teachers all over the country. Filemon also serves as a member of the Board of Trustees for the Philippine Science High School, the University of the Philippines and the Batangas State University, both of which have a student population of over 35,000.

    William Sands, WG’66 (St. Paul, Mn)

    Bill is involved in the Neighborhood Development Centers (NDC) established for residents and neighborhood groups of all communities to have the talent, energy and ideas to develop and revitalize their own neighborhoods through entrepreneurship.  They do this through four integrated programs:  *Entrepreneur Training; Small Busi ness Lending and financing; Technical Assistance and Business Incubators.  NDC has initiated the “Build from Within Alliance” with organizations across the country who are adopting and adapting the NDC model.  Together with his wife Susan, Bill has funder the Sands Family Social Venturing Fellowship for Carlson School of Management Students at the University of Minnesota.

    Russell Redenbaugh, WG’69. (Glen Mills, PA)

    Russell built a successful career as a registered investment advisor.  He did this while overcoming barrier set implicitly for someone who is sight impaired.
    Appointed as a Commissioner of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission for 15 years under three U.S. Presidents.

    In 2019

    Louis D’Amore, WG’64 (Utica, NY)

    After a successful career in economic and conservation consulting, Lous introduced “Tourscan” — an environmental scanning and forecasting project for the Canadian Tourism industry.  That led to the formation of the International Institute for Peace  through Tourism (IIPT), to which, upon ‘retirement’, he has devoted all of his experience, energy and time to the pursuit of it’s primary goal: a vision of travel and tourism become the world’s first global peace industry.  IIPT holds global ‘Tourism for Peace Conferences  that involves leaders of countries world wide- that have included heads of state and Nobel prize winners.   It also has created the notion of “Peace Parks” in Canada and worldwide — creating parks dedicated to world peace.

    Milt Silver, WG’52 (Huntington Valley, PA)

    It is hard to define the line between Milt’s role as a faculty member of Drexel University, where he served as Department Head of Management, and his ‘retirement’, to  which he continued devoting his experience, knowledge and energy in developing and mentoring entrepreneurs.  His focus is not only within Drexel University, but also within the Wharton Graduate Program. In recent years this has focused on technical startups both local in Philadelphia, as well as nationally and even internationally.  He is also a leader in Drexel’s collaborative initiative.  All of this was undertaken while volunteering as a Board member of his synagogue, coaching tennis and Little League baseball.  Milt is also a founding member of the Wharton Graduate Emeritus Society, serving on the WGES Steering committee since its inception.

    Fred Hallahan, WG’61 (Lutherville, MD)

    Fred was the founder of Hallahan Associates, a housing consultancy with a specific focus upon the market opportunities for innovative factory-based home building systems and investment efforts.  He also has spearheaded ‘daily bread employment centers (part of the Catholic Charities in Baltimore)  which provides client-direct job readiness training services for the ‘Work4Success Program on employment preparation. His focus has always been building more cost effective and operation efficiency with the health systems that are patient oriented.

    In 2018

    Gordon Dowsley, WG’69 (Oshawa, Ontario)

    Gordon’s career was in Financial Reinsurance for Crown Life Insurance of Canada.  During his work years, he  held  a number of positions in a Canadian political party which brought business and government closer together to understand each other’s views.  He also volunteered for the Multiple Sclerosis Society and “Eva’s Place”, a homeless shelter for teenagers. Gordon was also active in the Quebec separatist referendum focused on keeping Quebec in the Canadian government.  Other volunteer efforts led to appointments in the Board of Canada’s Council for the Arts and the Ontario College of Art and Design.

     

    His professional work involved international assignment which led to his being a founding member of the Japan society, working with orphans & homeless children  in Mongolia and Afghanistan, as well as organizing programs to build and support artists in both countries.  Hi assignment in Moscow led to the creation of a Rotarian Club which provided advanced hearing aids for children.

     

    In his ‘retirement” he remains active in the Rotary Clubs of Canada which provide books for children of ‘aboriginal peoples’ of northern Ontario which had to be delivered by ‘aid drops.”  He is also on the National Board of the Canadian Landmines Foundation and active for the past few years as a delegate to several international conferences celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Oxford Manifesto  devoted to the abolishing human rights abuses worldwide.

    Anthony (Tony) Gallo, WG’63 (Washington,DC)

    Following a 40 year careers a federal research economist, Tony re-invented him self as a playwright, a lyricist, book writer, director, predictor, odor, screenwriter, publisher and theatre owner.  The “Seventh Street Playhouse” that he established in Washington, Dc has had over 160 performances in 45 venues in Washington, DC, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York City.  He has written and produced 24 dramas.  He is also a librettist and lyricist for several musicals on musicals and has produced motion pictures.  17 of his drama publications are available from Amazon.  He is known as the “Wharton School Playwright” and is active professionally in a number of dramatic associations.  The vast majority of this effort is devoted to the message of religious tolerance and upholding basic Judeo-Christian ethics.

    Tony’s  second public service focus is that of a journalist and has made contributions to the National Press Club for the past 15 years.

    John (Jack) Smith, WG’52 (Lafayette Hill, PA)

    When attending a Wharton Graduate Reunion Luncheon between 1998 and 2002, you’d undoubtedly find Jack Smith meeting informally with the 50 year Class.  He loved a good time, but also had something on his mind — spreading the world about the ‘tea’ principle.

     

    His focus:  MBA’s 50 years out have acquired so much talent, experience and accomplishment, it’s a terrible waste to put them “out to pasture.’”  Both Wharton and Senior Alumni could benefit by creating a vehicle to increase contact and turn close relationships into good works  Thanks to Jack, the result was the Wharton Graduate Emeritus Society (WGES), established in 2003.  As our initial Chair of the WGES Steering committee, Jack helped shaped and guide the Society as it grew in programs, activities and  membership.

     

    Jack was dedicated and caring, full of good ideas, and had a love of Penn and Wharton. He was a strong mentor and contributor.  Everyone involved in WGES had the good fortunate to work with Jack in building the unique Society and strengthening Wharton continually.

    Richard Tecca, WG’58 (Hebron, CT)

    Richard’s volunteer work devoted to strengthen the arts and culture of his community began early in his professional career (1965) when he organized and direct a 70 voice volunteer ‘Collegiate Choir’ at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter & Paul in Philadelphia, where he was served a Director of Music.  This choir, now renamed The Adult Cathedral Choir, celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2014.

     

    Later in his career, when he worked in Connecticut and on into his ‘retirement’, he was a participant and active in two well-known and established choral groups:

    • The Hartford Chorale: Founded in 1972, the Hartford Chorale is a volunteer not-for-profit organization that presents masterpieces of great choral art on a symphonic scale for listeners throughout Southern New England. in addition singing with the chorale, Dick has served as Vice-President and a Member of the Governance Committee for several years
      • Connecticut Gilbert & Sullivan Society which has present annual shows of Gilbert & Sullivan’s comic operates in Connecticut since 1981. In addition to be a member of the cast each year in their performances, Dick served on the Society’s board and managed their Marketing program

    In 2017

    Charles Decker, WG ’64, (New York City and Dominican Republic)

    Charlie had a notable career in advertising and marketing with BBDO Advertising, Quaker Oats and Warner Brothers.  Upon ‘retirement’, he started living in the Dominican Republic half-time in 2004 and noted many indigent, often abandoned young children in the streets.  First volunteering at an orphanage near his home, he eventually started a foundation to help care for them.

     

    From the beginning, The Decker Foundation supports more than 1,000 children in three orphanages and a children’s activity center and mini school.  they range in age from six months to 18 years and the results ae encouraging.  Four students are in medical school, two are studying la, two in civil engineering and on in the arts.  Charlie’s foundation is now developing a college scholarship program and starting job training opportunities.

    Mike Wallace, WG’65 (Paris and Laos)

    Mike created a foundation that  funds scholarships to students for Laos-American College; mentors graduates and supports their career development;  innovates with startups and business plans — international.  Since 2010, lives in Laos 10 months a year, running a nonprofit that helps educate children and encourages would be entrepreneurs to develop small businesses

    Sponsoring students from poor rural areas includes school fees, books, food, health-care and even sleeping accommodations to Lao-American College in Vietnane.

    Mike meets  the criteria for a Crandall Challenge — high level of commitment and personal involvement.  Translates into involving any others  and focuses on impacting the business  economy and community in Laos.  Provides tangible results in terms of students who are involved, graduate and become an important element of the development of Laos a part of the wide world economy

    Recipients of the 2021 Crandall Challenge Citation

    This citation is in recognition of the large number of members who draw upon their Wharton Graduate acquired knowledge, talents,and experience to make a significant contribution to the improvement of community and national socio-economic quality of life through continuous and significant volunteer endeavors.

    Whether your efforts or projects involve a single community, your state, nationally or internationally, each submission will be equally considered and judged objectively on the basis of their creativity, operation, appeal and impact.

    Nominate one of your Wharton Graduate classmates, or yourself, for this recognition that will be given at the May 2018 WGES Reunion Luncheon.

    Submissions should describe the volunteer activities and endeavors of the Wharton Grad nominee focusing on:

    * goals, performance and achievement of civic engagement

    * continuity and extent of the volunteer’s involvement

    * significance of their socio-economic impacts

    * their innovative and creative nature

    In addition to the Citation, all nominees will be recognized and acknowledged to their Wharton Graduate classmates and the Wharton Family for their continued contribution to the socio-economic fabric nationally and internationally.

    Nominations can be submitted anytime between December 2017 and February 15, 2018, and should be emailed to the emeritussociety@wharton.upenn.edu

    Malcolm Bund, WG ’74. (San Diego, CA)


    David Nevins, WG’70 (State College, PA)


    Click here to view 2020 Awardees

    Recipients of the 2020 Crandall Challenge Citation

    Reid Becker, WG ’74 (Zirconia, NC)

    Filemon Berba, WG’64 (Antipolo City, Philippines)

    William Sands, WG’66 (St. Paul, MN)

    Russell Redenbaugh, WG’69 (Glenn Mills, PA)

    Click here to view 2019 Crandall Challenge Awardees

    Recipients of the 2019 Crandall Challenge Citation

    Louis D’Amore, WG’64. (Utica, NY)

    Fred Hallahan, WG’61 (Lutherville, MD)

    Milt Silver, WG’52 (Huntingdon Valley, PA)

    Click Here to View 2018 Crandall Challenge Awardees

    Recipients of the 2018 Crandall Challenge Citation

    Anthony (Tony) Gallo, WG’63 (Washington, DC)

    Following a 40-year careers a federal research economist, Tony re-invented himself as a playwright, a lyricist, book writer, director, predictor, odor, screenwriter, publisher and theatre owner. The “Seventh Street Playhouse” that he established in Washington, Dc has had over 160 performances in 45 venues in Washington, DC, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York City. He has written and produced 24 dramas. He is also a librettist and lyricist for several musicals on musicals and has produced motion pictures. 17 of his drama publications are available from Amazon. He is known as the “Wharton School Playwright” and is active professionally in a number of dramatic associations. The vast majority of this effort is devoted to the message of religious tolerance and upholding basic Judeo-Christian ethics.

    Tony’s second public service focus is that of a journalist and his made contributions to the National Press Club for the past 15 years.

    John (Jack) Smith, WG’52 (Lafayette Hill, PA)

    When attending a Wharton Graduate Reunion Luncheon between 1998 and 2002, you would undoubtedly find Jack Smith meeting informally with the 50 year Class. He loved a good time, but also had something on his mind — spreading the world about the ‘tea’ principle.

    His focus: MBA’s 50 years out have acquired so much talent, experience and accomplishment, it is a terrible waste to put them “out to pasture.’” Both Wharton and Senior Alumni could benefit by creating a vehicle to increase contact and turn close relationships into good works. Thanks to Jack, the result was the Wharton Graduate Emeritus Society (WGES), established in 2003. As our initial Chair of the WGES Steering committee, Jack helped shaped and guide the Society as it grew in programs, activities and membership.

    Jack was dedicated and caring, full of good ideas, and had a love of Penn and Wharton. He was a strong mentor and contributor. Everyone involved in WGES had the good fortunate to work with Jack in building the unique Society and strengthening Wharton continually.

    Richard Tecca, WG’58 (Hebron, CT)

    Richard’s volunteer work devoted to strengthen the arts and culture of his community began early in his professional career (1965) when he organized and directed a 70 voice volunteer ‘Collegiate Choir’ at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter & Paul in Philadelphia, where he was served a Director of Music. This choir, now renamed The Adult Cathedral Choir, celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2014.

    Later in his career, when he worked in Connecticut and on into his ‘retirement’, he was a participant and active in two well-known and established choral groups:
    * The Hartford Chorale: Founded in 1972, the Hartford Chorale is a volunteer not-for-profit organization that presents masterpieces of great choral art on a symphonic scale for listeners throughout Southern New England. in addition singing with the chorale, Dick has served as Vice-President and a Member of the Governance Committee for several years
    * Connecticut Gilbert & Sullivan Society which has present annual shows of Gilbert & Sullivan’s comic operates in Connecticut since 1981. In addition to be a member of the cast each year in their performances, Dick served on the Society’s board and managed their Marketing program

    Click Her to View 2017 Crandall Challenge Awardees

    Recipients of the 2017 Crandall Challenge Citation

    Charles Decker, WG ‘64 (New York City and Dominican Republic)

    Charlie Decker had a notable career in advertising and marketing with BBDO Advertising, Quaker Oats and Warner Brothers. He started living in the Dominican Republic half time in 2004 and noted many indigent, often abandoned young children in the streets. First volunteering at an orphanage near his home, he eventually started a foundation to help care for them.

    From the beginning, The Decker Foundation supports more than 1,000 children in three orphanages and a children’s activity center and mini school. They range in age from six months to 18 years and the results ae encouraging. Four students are in medical school, two are studying la, two in civil engineering and on in the arts. Charlie’s foundation is now developing a college scholarship program and starting job training opportunities.

    Mike Wallace, WG’65 (Paris and Laos)

    Mike created a Foundation that funds scholarships to students for Laos-American College; mentors graduates and supports their career development; innovates with startups and business plans — international. Since 2010, lives in Laos 10 months a year, running a nonprofit that helps educate children and encourages would be entrepreneurs to develop small businesses

    Sponsoring students from poor rural areas includes school fees, books, food, health-care and even sleeping accommodations to Lao-American College in Vietnam.

    Mike meets the criteria for a Crandall Challenge — high level of commitment and personal involvement. Translates into involving any others and focuses on impacting the business economy and community in Laos. Provides tangible results in terms of students who are involved, graduate and become an important element of the development of Laos a part of the wide world economy.

    Click here to view the Honor Roll

    Honor Roll

    This honor roll is in recognition of the large number of Wharton Graduate Emeritus Society members who draw upon the skills, knowledge and talents they acquired at Wharton Graduate to make significant contributions to the improvement of their communities and to the quality of life of our nation through continuous volunteer endeavors.

    Below are the 2017 – 2021 Nominees for the WGES Crandall Challenge Citation

    Alan Ahrens, WG’63 (Lynchburg, VA)

    Alan has devoted himself to being a “Business Mentor” for SCORE (a nonprofit dedicated to providing experienced ‘retired’ business executives to provide face-to-face help for new businesses as business counselors and mentors.) The Lynchburg SCORE chapter has provided business counseling to over 600 clients from several large counties in Central Virginia.

    Alan was also a founding director of the central Virginia Academy for Nonprofit Excellence (CVANE), which is affiliated with the Central Virginia Community College and has established a Certification in Non-Profit Management.

    John Baker, WG’68 (Wallowa, OR)

    When John and his wife retired to a 63 acre ranch in Oregon, in 2001, they devoted their talents, time and energy as Founders, Board member and Treasurer of the “Joseph Branch Trail “ consortium which is a $20,000,000 trail restoration project in Wallowa County, Oregon. In addition to walking/biking/hiking/riding trails, a major goal is also to improve the fish habitats of Steelhead and Chinook salmon. In addition to working with Oregon and federal agencies and the Bonneville Power Administration, John works closely with the sovereign nation of the New Pierce Tribe to restore Fish Habitat in the Wallowa River in Oregon, which is part of the coho salmon 600 mile journey that includes the Pacific Ocean, as well as the Columbia and Snake Rivers

    Nancy Barnes, WG’76 (Austin, TX)

    Nancy has devoted her time and energy in three Austin nonprofit’s activities: the Ballet Austin Guild, which promotes growth an involvement in ballet cultural arts in the Austin metropolitan area. She also is involved with the Assistance League of Austin’s Thrift Shop which provides clothing for needy children and teens and the Hays County Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)

    Reid Becker, WG’74 (Zirconia, NC)

    Reid’s career included starting his own medical diagnostic business. When he ‘retired’ , he become part of a STEAM Tech Team, volunteers who work to support Science, Technology, Engineering Art and Math programs in the schools located in the Greenville, SC metro area. The volunteers are retired professionals active in the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute of Furman University. The programs include: E-Nable Prosthetic Hands , Vex competition robotics, Biomolecules, Quadcopters and Drones 3-D printing and designs. “E-Nable” is a worldwide movement of tinkerers, engineers, 3D print enthusiasts, occupational therapists, university professors, designers, parents, families, artists, students, teachers and people who just want to make a difference by printing on 3D printers hands that they give for free to children all over the world. Over 700 hands were created by over 3200 volunteers around the globe.

    Filemon Berba, WG’64 (Antipolo City, Philippines)

    Following his career in several Philippine companies that included electric and water public utilities, electronic and pharmaceutical industries, Filemon has devoted his retirement to the Philippine Foundation for Science and Technology (PFST). This Foundation, of which he was a founder, has the objective of creating a critical mass of young people exposed to science with the intent of preparing them for engineering and technological careers. As President and Chair of the PFST Board of Trustees, he has developed outreach programs that involve 400,000 Philippine high school students each year. They created the Philippine Science Centrum, the first interactive science museum in the country. Since the Philippines is an archipelago, they created 7 mobile exhibits that over the years have been visited by 7 million students and teachers. They have trained 6000 teachers all over the country. Filemon also serves as a member of the Board of Trustees for the Philippine Science High School, the University of the Philippines and the Batangas State University, both of which have a student population of over 35,000.

    Roger Blood, WG’66 (Chestnut Hill, MA)

    A Private mortgage industry pioneer, Roger worked to increase affordable housing in Boston. He was Chair of the HAB (Housing Advisory Board). Trustee for Brookline’s Affordable Housing Trust) with 200 affordable apartments.

    He is a Co-founder of the Metropolitan Waterworks Museum, which preserves a historic structure in Boston – Metro Waterworks Museum of Chestnut Hill — an Educational venue for the Boston area’s schools. It is also used for weddings.

    Annually, it attracts tens of thousands children and adult visitors.

    Willem Adrianus de Bruijn, WG’67 (Hoeilaart, Belguim)

    At Wharton I knew that the consumer had to be paid to maintain ways of living that keep the environment unblemished. I spent the rest of my life to prove why this has to be done and how it can be done. I succeeded. In the meantime I developed an information system for a multinational to manage its investment programs in Europe and helped to organize a world congress one water resources.

    To launch the Ethical Market Economy with as objective to enable mankind to live inharmony with Nature. The scope is to solve the planetary ecological problems. I made the theory about the EmE sound

    To survive with more than seven billion people, they must always spend all their money only on goods and services that leave the environment unharmed. In that case, they manage their cost of living to maintain that state of the environment together.

    Jon Brumley, WG’63 (Fort Worth, TX)

    Jon has provided a wide range of scholarships for business and Hi-tech students and funded the Texas Venture Labs, a startup accelerator at the University of Texas, Austin (known as the Jon & Rebecca Bromley Business Accelerator.) He has also funded the Bromley Next Generation Graduate Fellows at the Robert Strauss Center at the University of Texas.

    He was appointed Chair of the Texas State Board of Education in 1984. Together with his wife, he founded the Red Oak Foundation that in addition to providing scholarships for students planning to become public school teachers in Texas as well a funding books and programs focused on reading readiness, has been devoted to a large number of nonprofit human services and education nonprofit organizations.

    Jon was inducted into the Petroleum Hall of Fame and recognized by Forbes Magazine in 2005 as “Entrepreneur of the Year.”

    Malcolm Bund, WG’74 (San Diego, CA)

    My private equity group bought Precision Alternator and Starter. Thereafter I started a private/public sector non-profit to provide transportation to the needy, Vehicles for Change (VFC). VFC has been a home run. Today, 22 years after inception in 1998, we have provided over 8000 vehicles to the needy, who have achieved 30% higher wages as a result of having their own transportation. In addition VFC trains released prisoners to become auto mechanics through training and ASE certification. Since 2015 VFC has placed 150 mechanics in gainful employment with several graduates earning six figures. Key Advisor to Kitchens for Good (KFG), which trains ex-cons to work in the food service industry. Trainees take donated commodities and prepare meals donated to the homeless and the disadvantaged.

    Sewon Clough, WG’64. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

    Sewon’s professional career included working on project control for Bechtel Corporation. He also was the owner a Hallmark Shop in Huntington Beach, CA. Since his ‘retirement’ in 1989, Sewon has been part of a husband-wife Amkor network devoted to feeding homeless people. This involved recruiting local churches to create soup kitchens and cooking and serving the meals. He has also written a book that helps explain the Bible to those who cannot come to church for Sunday worship.

    • Continues long time effort to seek out the homeless and give them necessities.
    • Has paid for and given out thousands of meals to the homeless.
    • At the end of his career, he moved to Indonesia for four years LNG plant. He and his family lived in the jungle and during this time he helped local people.

    Marc Cooper WG’68 (South Boston, MA)

    Marc sold his ice cream business but her turned over his separate desert toppings business to a non-profit (WOW – Working Opportunities for Women) which employs disadvantaged women. In the greater Boston area.

    Robert Crawford, WG’63 (Lake Forest, IL)

    Robert founded Neighborhood Entrepreneurship Lab (NEL) in Chicago in 2017. Paired with non-profit lender, NEL works with entrepreneurs from disadvantaged communities providing mentoring, business plan awards, capital. Currently there 20 entrepreneurs in program.

    The Neighborhood Entrepreneurship Lab (NEL) provides grants for entre startups that focuses on disadvantaged communities. It partners with the Chicago Community Trust.

    Mark Cummings, WG’74 (Atherton, CA)

    Mark is a current and longtime advocate and supporter of organizations raising the alarm about the need for more cybersecurity. He is a founding member of CTO, and a board member: Bace Cybersecurity Institute (BCI). BCI is dedicated to education, public policy, R&D, etc. to address this problem.

    In another initiative, Mark have been a co-organizer of an initiative focused on meeting the existential planet wide problems we face including global warming, pandemics, food scarcity, water scarcity, and nuclear weapons. This initiative is conducted under the title of “Death or Utopia”. A video of the initial webinar that kicked it off is available on You Tube.

    Louis D’Amore, WG’64 (Utica, NY)

    After a successful career in economic and conservation consulting, Lous introduced “Tourscan” — an environmental scanning and forecasting project for the Canadian Tourism industry. That led to the formation of the International Institute for Peace through Tourism (IIPT), to which, upon ‘retirement’, he has devoted all of his experience, energy and time to the pursuit of it’s primary goal: a vision of travel and tourism become the world’s first global peace industry. IIPT holds global ‘Tourism for Peace Conferences that involves leaders of countries world wide- that have included heads of state and Nobel prize winners. It also has created the notion of “Peace Parks” in Canada and worldwide — creating parks dedicated to world peace.

    MaryFrances Davis, WG’70 (Greater Philadelphia)

    MaryFrances is responsible for the rejuvenation of the Philadelphia Mortgage Plan which made tens of thousands mortgages to stabilize housing in North-Central Philadelphia. Her focus has been, and continues to be corporate-community initiatives, which focuses on renovating low-income apartments and houses. For example, in Bristol County, she help set up Better Homes, Inc. for fund raising, construction management training and homebuyer training.

    Charles Decker, WG ’64, (New York City and Dominican Republic)

    Charlie had a notable career in advertising and marketing with BBDO Advertising, Quaker Oats and Warner Brothers. Upon ‘retirement’, he started living in the Dominican Republic half-time in 2004 and noted many indigent, often abandoned young children in the streets. First volunteering at an orphanage near his home, he eventually started a foundation to help care for them.

    From the beginning, The Decker Foundation supports more than 1,000 children in three orphanages and a children’s activity center and mini school. they range in age from six months to 18 years and the results ae encouraging. Four students are in medical school, two are studying la, two in civil engineering and on in the arts. Charlie’s foundation is now developing a college scholarship program and starting job training opportunities.

    Charles Dixon, WG’70, (San Francisco, CA)

    Very active Board member of Fillmore Jazz Ambassadors (FJA) whose missions is to create a thriving bay area jazz environment that sustains, develops and honors jazz practitioners. Fillmore is a district in S.F. known as “Harlem of the West”. It focuses on creating a thriving jazz environment for current and future generation of musicians. Charles worked with the founder (Darlene Roberts)  to established FJA as a leading jazz organization and community in S.F

    “I Devote my  retirement to uplifting my  underserved community. In whatever capacity possible.”

    Gordon Dowsley, WG’69 (Oshawa, Ontario)

    Gordon’s career was in Financial Reinsurance for Crown Life Insurance of Canada. During his work years, he (A) held a number of positions in a Canadian political party, which brought business and government closer together to understand each other’s views, and (B) volunteered for the Multiple Sclerosis Society and “Eva’s Place”, a homeless shelter for teenagers. He also was active in the Quebec separatist referendum focused on keeping Quebec in the Canadian government. Other volunteer efforts led to appointments in the Board of Canada’s Council for the Arts and the Ontario College of Art and Design.

    His professional work involved international assignment, which led to his being a founding member of the Japan society, working with orphans & homeless children in Mongolia and Afghanistan, as well as organizing programs to build and support artists in both countries. His assignment in Moscow led to the creation of a Rotarian Club which provided advanced hearing aids for children.

    In his ‘retirement” he remains active in the Rotary Clubs of Canada which provide books for children in the of ‘aboriginal peoples’ of northern Ontario which had to be delivered by ‘aid drops.” He is also on the National Board of the Canadian Landmines Foundation and active for the past few years as a delegate to several international conferences celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Oxford Manifesto devoted to the abolishing human rights abuses worldwide.

    Julio Estrada, WG’69 (Lima, Peru)

    Julio is a guide for teaching Peruvian culture. He devotes his retirement knowledge and skills in strengthening and building tourism in Peru. He is involved in improving the environment in Peru in innovative ways, in a country highly dependent on oil. Julio is also an actor in theater groups in Peru.

    Edwin Feulner, WG’64, (Alexandria, VA)

    Following a long and distinguished career as the Assistant to several Secretaries of Federal Departments and Congressmen, Ed has devoted his retirement to two organizations he helped form and been active in: The Heritage Foundation and the ‘Mont Pelerin Society’, an international group of scholars committed to advancing the free society. Both are well known for a large number of national and international programs and research they dedicated to improving societal wellbeing through the promotion of ideas focused on free market efficiency, the rule of law and individual liberty. Ed has also been involved in charitable work with his church and has been a trustee of Regis University in Denver and of George Mason University. He is a founder of the Wharton School Club in Washington, DC.

    George ‘Chip’ Fisher IV, WG’64

    Chip’s business career has centered on Sun Valley ID and its development. Previous work chairing Idaho efforts supporting the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City led to his being chosen to financially turn around the Special Olympics Winter Games in 2009, earning a surplus. He subsequently chaired the R4 Alliance, serving 175,000 servicemen with disabilities, growing from 8 founding members to 58 Programs of Excellence serving our veterans

    For over 50 years Chip has served a board member for multiple not for profit organizations in Sun Valley, Idaho to create a cradle to rest upon. For to Chip’s mind, the lure of Sun Valley lies within the wellbeing of its not for profits be them hospitals, educational institutions, art centers or ski educational programs. In the 1990’s-2020’s Chip was asked by four different Idaho Governor’s to participate and help lead Idaho’s efforts to reframe the State’s educational system. The second and third Governor had Chip to Chairing the Idaho Olympic Commission to assist Utah in staging the Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City in 2002. A fourth Governor asked Chip to turn around a failing Organizing Committee that was to host the 2009 Special Olympic World Games in 2009, which he did and became the one the largest Special Olympic Winter Game to this day and the first to earn a surplus.

    David Foster, WG’72, (Salem, VA)

    I am Chairman of a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization called RAIL Solution. It is a grassroots, all-volunteer advocacy group promoting the energy, economic, and environmental advantages of rail transportation, I have been involved with this group since its founding in 2003.

    Railroad electrification is the low hanging fruit, because it is standard technology in use worldwide and requires no big R&D expense or lead time. But Americas railroads need more than that to maximize public benefit in years ahead. We need a core national network of railroad mainlines that are multi-track, high capacity, grade-separated, and electrified. This is analogous to what the Eisenhower Interstate Highway System did for roads. Such a Steel Interstate system would be the backbone for movement of goods and people in decades to come, forging multifold benefits to the public in mobility, environment, safety, transportation cost, and competitiveness.

    Anthony (Tony) Gallo, WG’63 (Washington,DC)

    Following a 40 year careers a federal research economist, Tony re-invented him self as a playwright, a lyricist, book writer, director, predictor, odor, screenwriter, publisher and theatre owner. The “Seventh Street Playhouse” that he established in Washington, Dc has had over 160 performances in 45 venues in Washington, DC, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York City. He has written and produced 24 dramas. He is also a librettist and lyricist for several musicals on musicals and has produced motion pictures. 17 of his drama publications are available from Amazon. He is known as the “Wharton School Playwright” and is active professionally in a number of dramatic associations. The vast majority of this effort is devoted to the message of religious tolerance and upholding basic Judeo-Christian ethics.

    Tony’s second public service focus is that of a journalist and has made contributions to the National Press Club for the past 15 years.

    David Gingras, WG’76, (Bala Cynwyd, PA)

    Served as President of the Manhattan Council, BSA serving the mayor of New York City. He served as President of LuLu Shriners and the Shriners Hospital of Philadelphia. He served as President of the Philadelphia University Alumni Association and Trustee of the University. He is also a Colonel in the New York National Guard and was active in response and recovery to the World Trade Center incident.

    Fred Hallahan, WG’61 (Lutherville, MD)

    Fred was the founder of Hallahan Associates, a housing consultancy with a specific focus upon the market opportunities for innovative factory-based home building systems. His volunteer work concentrated on the Medstar health hospital board governance. The Medstar health system is the largest healthcare provider in Maryland and the Washington, DC region. He has been an active participant in Medstar strategic planning, finance and investment efforts. He also has spearheaded ‘daily bread employment centers (part of the Catholic Charities in Baltimore) which provides client-direct job readiness training services for the ‘Work4Success Program on employment preparation. His focus has always been building more cost effective and operation efficiency with the health systems that are patient oriented.

    John Heinrich, WG ‘68, (Scottsdale, AZ)

    President of The Association of Former Intelligence Officers, Arizona Chapter, which is a group that seeks to provide interesting speakers on current intelligence events, such as Afghanistan, Ukraine and the Middle East. We recruit speakers from all over the US, using Zoom Rooms for talks. AFIO’s goal is to build a public constituency for a sound, healthy and capable U.S. intelligence system. We provide education and current assessments of the important role of intelligence in ensuring the security of the Unites States, its infrastructure, businesses and individuals from a wide range of current threats.

    Created Solutions Forum as a therapy group for entrepreneurs, since they can talk over anything in the groups of one/one meetings and it’s all confidential. Published an e-book in 2021 on How to Start, Run and Sell Your Business, which we give away to prospective clients, even before they become clients, to establish a framework for what we might do. As an outgrowth of the book, we restarted ‘Entrepreneurial News’ as part of the Solutions Forum website, and we make the blog posts freely available to everyone. We think our readership is about 10,000per month. We helped about 50 businesses in the Maricopa County area over the last 18 years, and the average sales gain has been over $100,000 in 18months. We have kept companies in business through COVID. Hundreds of jobs were either saved or created. We facilitated five PPP loans for members, keeping about 150 people employed.

    Carmen Hill, WG’74 (Cerritos, CA)

    Multicultural Real Estate Alliance, South LA In challenged South Los Angeles neighborhoods, work in affordable housing, counseling for home ownership, avoiding homelessness.

    Organized and directed the Harambee Housing Information Program at a local spiritual center to provide counseling to those at risk of homelessness (6 years).

    Have made an impact on the south LA community by sharing my financial skills and resourcefulness: addressing homelessness, foreclosure prevention, homeownership, and affordable housing.

    Provide workshops in the community [neighborhood councils, real estate associations, community centers, churches, schools, etc.) on Building Wealth by Building the Community on how property owners/investors can provide affordable housing by accessing government resources.

    Karl Ideman WG’70, (Glastonbury, CT)

    Chair of South Congregational Church Missions Committee to oversee outreach to our local and worldwide community; Chair of the Connecticut Pre-Engineering Program (CPEP) to provide access to higher education for underserved people in Connecticut in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics; Committee Chair of the National Association of Comprehensive Health Insurance Plans (NASCHIP) to provide access to commercial health insurance for uninsurable people with high cost health conditions in 35 states; Volunteer Consultant on the Internal Revenue Task Force as part of President Reagan’s Private Sector Survey on Federal Cost Control;Co-Consultant with Urban Institute on the State Coverage Initiatives by Academy Health as sponsored by the Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation; Trustee of the Defiance College for 20+ years and member of the Institutional Advancement Committee, and the Long RangePlanning and Strategic Initiatives task force to enhance the institution’s programs, quality and culture.

    I found out about a foundation from a fellow trustee on the Defiance College Board and since have learned about the win-win scenario when a living donor can be matched with a kidney failure recipient. The result is longer and better quality of life for the recipient and significant immediate reduction in costs to all the other interested parties. I am now trying to help construct a high-tech process for this foundation and its partners to incentivize transplants and to deliver their services to large organizations that have the empathy and the resources to support a Kidney Transplant Program to spread their health plan’s high-risk costs and also to subsidize the out of pocket costs for the donors and recipients. This Program would complement the work of the NationalKidney Foundation and others whose processes and methodology differ.

    Bob Killebrew, WG’64 (Cockeysville, MD)

    Chairs substantial capital campaigns for a wide variety of non-profit organizations which have raised in excess of $200m. Some of the Maryland community institutions he has played a major role in include the Enoch Pratt Library and the Red Cross. Bob also served on the Board of the Baltimore Parks and Recreation Department.

    Woodrin Grossman WG’68 (Forth Worth,TX)

    Ten year effort as campaign chair and fund raiser to purchase and renovate an overnight camp for those with physical and mental disabilities Camp Summit – nonprofit overnight camp for people of all ages with physical and developmental disabilities.

    Camp Summit, Texas Worked as a volunteer with this nonprofit overnight camp for people of all ages with physical and developmental disabilities. Was campaign chair and worked with our CEO to acquire, renovate and raise $13 + million to fund the purchase and renovation of the camp on 460 acres A ten year journey which established our forever home to replace a camp that was on leased property.

    Harold (Hal) Kurfehs, WG’64 (Brookfield, CT)

    Both during his career as a banker and in “retirement”, Hal has devoted his professional talents and experience, time and energy into the economic and community development of the fastest growing region of Connecticut – southwestern Connecticut. He is Chair of WCEDA (Western Connecticut Economic Development Alliance) — a partnership between public and private leaders seeking to expand the economy of Western Connecticut. This includes a large number of municipalities in Fairfield and Litchfield Counties. He is active in his community, as Chair of the Brookfield (CT) Economic Development Commission, his region (WCEDA) and the Cultural Alliance of Western CT and for the State of Connecticut as creator of the Connecticut Economic Resource Center, which promotes CT as an economic basis for a large number of corporations.

    Hal is listed in Marquis Who’s Who and contributes regularly to professional journals and newspapers on economic and community development. He is also a lecturer for the Ancell School of Business for Western CT State University.

    Howard Kroplick, WG’73 (East Hills, NY)

    Howard was Founder, CEO and President of a leading medical communications company focused on promotional and educational programs for pharmaceutical products. Upon ‘retirement’ he re-invented himself. Howard is a town historian, land and motor parkway preservationist, author, lecturer, automobile racing and car culture enthusiast, child abuse prevention volunteer and owner of four historic automobiles. As if that wasn’t enough for devoting his experience and talents to community efforts, Howard is also an actor. Since 2012, Howard has been the official Town Historian of North Hempstead, Long Island; it can be considered a model of the role and function of town historians, which are usually not recognized or appreciated despite the fact that they exist in a very large number of communities all across the USA.

    Charles Kurz, II, WG’69 (Bryn Mawr, PA)

    Charles has provided leadership in the capital campaigns, scholarships and endowments in a number of colleges, churches and summer camps that include Trinity College and Asylum Hill Congregational church in Hartford, CT, Camp Tecumseh in New Hampshire and the Valley Presbyterian Foundation in Arizona. Charles also created a scholarship fund at Wharton that annually supports Kurz Family Scholars.

    Campbell Johnson, WG’73 (Washington, DC)

    Both during his professional career as a senior management consultant and during “retirement Campbell has devoted himself to fighting displacement of low and moderate income residents from being forced our o their homes due to gentrification of their established neighborhoods. Starting a Tenant Association Director and then as Executive Director of the Urban Housing Alliance(UHA), he has created a wide range of programs to expand affordable housing options for low and moderate income residents of the District of Columbia. UHA is incorporated under Collaborative Alliances of America, which also focuses on sharing their expertise to split disadvantaged communities in other countries. Due to Campbell’s efforts, the Housing production Trust Fund was created as major tool to produce and preserve affordable housing in the District. He focusses all of his talent, experience and energy to make Washington, DC a better place to work and live.

    Alvin Lee, WG’71. (Baltimore, MD)

    Alvin created “Park Walk America” to promote better health, fitness, sustainability and environmental awareness with a pilot market in Baltimore, but with the intent of building a national network of urban cities. Its goal is to develop healthy people, healthy communities, healthy businesses and a healthy environment. It is a social enterprise through ABC Ventures, Inc devoted to educating Black America. (“parkwalkamerica.com”)

    Wyn Lydecker, WG’76 (Darien, CN)

    I helped found a local nonprofit, At Home In Darien. The organization’s original name was Aging In Place in Darien. Its purpose is to empower older adults remain in their homes and the community as they age. The organization provides transportation, handyman services, a list of vetted professional service providers, and connection to community. It has grown and flourished over the past 12 years, even during the pandemic, providing truly essential services to more and more seniors in Darien, Connecticut, with no fees for membership or services provided by volunteers.

    Wyn wrote a blog for the Wharton Magazine about starting a nonprofit.

    Brian MacIver, WG’71 (Lexington, MA)

    Brian just retired and started a new career as a volunteer at the Boston Museum of Science, working with inner-city second graders. He is helping kids learn about science and nature. This Science Museum is one of the best in the USA and a major pleasure attraction and science educational center on the east coast for schools in the New England states

    James McElwee, WG’76 (Menlo Park, CA)

    Thru healthcare industry experience, developed integrated health programs to serve 38,000 homeless in 13 California counties. Revamped board and created bond issue to finance desired organization capabilities. I joined the board of HealthRIGHT 360 in San Francisco six years ago. HealthRIGHT 360 is a family of integrated health programs that provides care and treatment to over 38,000 individuals a year through more than 70 distinct and culturally competent programs in 13 California counties.

    As a result of her strategies the organization addresses the whole individual not just subsets of their needs. HealthRIGHT is very good with respect to drug addiction and mental health.

    My experience at HealthRIGHT has been very satisfying in that the target customer base of the organization are homeless and others with the most urgent needs.

    Avrum Marks WG’58 (Burke, VA)

    Following 22 years with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and 16 years in the private sector, Arum began devoting his time, energy and experience in the community in the following ways:
    * Circulation desk of his local library
    * Docent at the Smithsonian’s American History Museum. Visitors also include members of Congress and business executives.
    * As an Usher at the Wolf Trap Farm entertainment National Park
    * Welcoming International arrivals at Dulles International Airport. Monthly this includes WWII and Korean War Veterans for a tour of Washington, DC.

    David Morgan, WG’69 (Cambridge, Ontario)

    It’s fascinating how careers morph in ways that determine how one will spend their “retirement’ following a successful professional life. David has had a multidisciplinary 50 year career in Industrial Sales & Marketing Economic Forecasting, Market Research, Environmental compliance and final Commercial Real Estate Brokerage. It is the last focus in his career that shaped David “retirement”, which he has devoted to CCIM (Certified Commercial Investment Members), an affiliate of the National Association of Realtors in the USA. It is the pinnacle of service and achievement in commercial real estate brokerage and investment in North America. He devotes his experience and energy in leadership of CCIM Chapters in Central Canada (from Ontario, east through Quebec to the Atlantic Provinces.). Almost all new CCIM Designees in Canada since 2007 have been David’s Mentees. Recently, David has been Regional Vice President for the CCIM.

    Rick Moore, WG’70 (Memphis, TN)

    During his career with Lehman Roberts, and in retirement, Rick Moore, together with wife Cary, ha devoted their talents, time and energy in improving the social, economic and spiritual lives of underprivileged Memphis residents. Their vehicle has been unusual, My Cup of Tea, (MCOT) which they now own and operate, is a small nonprofit business of tea packaging and distribution of 30 varieties of teas that funds the operation of the Center’s programs and activities. However, it operates out of a Center in Memphis’s “Orange Mound” where it houses a number of women who are escaping poverty and neglect. A large number of women work for My Cup of Tea and others use it as a center for vocational training, computer literacy, financial planning, GED preparation and life recovery.

    Rick, together with his wife, work closely with a large number of programs and activities of Memphis’s Neighborhood Christian Centers and with Advance Memphis, and organization devoted to economic advancement of the low income residents and families.

    David Nevins, WG’70 (State College, PA)

    Co-founded the Bridge Alliance in 2014 of which I am now the chairman of the board. The Bridge Alliance has had remarkable growth and is now an alliance of over 100 organizations all working to create the healthy self-governance that is promised in our founding documents and so badly needed in our country. The work of the Bridge Alliance the last 5 years is now recognized and referenced as a critical component and coalition….a cross-partisan constituency of 11+ million Americans who are dedicated to renewing our democracy.

    Richard Ossen, WG’63 (Fort Myers, FL)

    Leadership positions to maintain and preserve the shellfish and quahog breeding and estuary areas for future generations.
    Chairman of our gated community’s Activities and Fitness Committee (CAF) 2016-present Board member of our community’s United Way Committee 2018-present Past President (2007/2008) and active member of Barnstable Assn. for Recreational Shellfishing (BARS) 2004-present.

    Provide some for BARS, it is our work with the Town’s Dept. of Natural Resources to insure future generations will be able to continue to enjoy shellfishing as we have. We help propagate thousands of oysters and quahogs every year, insure clean water and make sure residents have a way to reach the shellfish areas.

    Jerome F. (Rick) Peck, WG’68 (Lovettsville, VA)

    Following a 30-year career with Price Waterhouse, where he was a Partner, and as CFO for the Army Times Publishing company, Rick made a major career change, and became a Science Teacher in a Sterling, VA Middle School. In addition to teach, he has author professional articles on science & climate for educational journals and website.

    Rick summarizes his response to the Crandall Challenge in the following way: “Impact is what motivates me. As it will you. Whether it’s gardening, or being a chef, or music — and whether it’s a few hours here and there, or getting submerged big time, as I have, I go for it – where “it” is a vital part of the person you are, and the “it” improves the lives of others, our environment, just about anything that we care about. Bring the you you’ve become to make a difference.”

    C. DeWitt “Pete” Peterson WG’56, (Morristown, NJ)

    “Pete” has been active in supporting and sponsoring jazz music in southern New Jersey for decades.  In addition to being president of JVOP for years, he has hosted 39 jazz ‘picnics’ in his own back yard since 2007 with attendance ranging from 20 to 150.  His concerts includes leaning jazz musicians in the North east and mid-atlantic states.

    His claim to “fame” was that he ran the Jazz Vespers at Old Pine, (JVOP) in Society Hill, Philadelphia for 21 years every third Sunday involving over 400 musicians, 100 speakers, many volunteers from several churches, and many fine memories of 252 services. The Inquirer said it was the largest continuous inter-racial, inter-denominational, inter generational happening in the city. We had just about every jazz musician in the area. Attendance was usually about 200 with lows of 50 and highs of 300 with one at 750 (Grover Washington, Jr,) It died because Old Pine members never supported it in numbers or steady volunteers.

    “Pete” was also was founding president of Tri-State Jazz Society from 1988 to 2007. It still is going strong with monthly trad jazz concerts, 300 members, a host of volunteers. Events attract 100 to 250people. Over the years we were in many places: hotels, motels, churches, restaurants, womans’ clubs, community centers, and such. We hire bands from Philly, NYC, NJ, PA, DC, and evenNew England and Ohio. Today the concerts are in as NJ church and a PA Community Art Center.

    Victor Puyat, WG’64, (Makati, Philippines)

    While I was busy with my professional work I was involved in education, I was part of a new school called (PAREF),Parent for EducationalFoundation, its core educational philosophy rests on the principle, supported by research, that the fullness of the child’s education is effectively realized through the integral formation, first of parents, second of the teachers the two most influential teachers of children.

    As an adjunct of PAREF I was also with Educhild. As an important influencer of children, parents have to be formed also on how to handle their children. We give courses developed mostly in Spain, that last several months on weekly home based sessions of couples who have to raise their children to be loving, helpful, forgiving, persevering honest adults.

    I’m also a director of FAMAF Family Media Advocate Foundation, to provide media outlets articles that affect family ,which is the basicfoundation of the society. Lastly I worked with Families for Family that asserted that population control will lead to an ageing population andwill cause widespread problems.

    I started Loyola Memorial Park in early 1966, 2 years after my MBA. The first park was followed by one more in the south of Metro Manila.The Board Members decided to engage in Mortuary Business .In Spite of my objections, they persisted that we should. Again a challenge tome. I did not know anything about Mortuary business. It was an order of the board of directors, therefore I had to find the right people to run it which I was able to do.

    Richard (Dick) Rappleye, WG’65 (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    Upon retirement from a stellar career, Dick continued having an impact statewide by working to improve Michigan Nonprofit organizations and serving as a business mentor. He served on the Michigan Nonprofit Associations (MNA) Technology Services Advisory Board to provide “realistic technology solutions that allow nonprofits to be stable, secure and able to plan for the future.”

    He also serves on the Michigan State’s Bar Foundation that supports civil legal aid to the poor, law relate education and conflict resolution. His also on the University of Michigan-Flint Citizens Advisory Committee to advise the Board and Chancellor on the effectiveness of University services. He participates in business mentoring in both Detroit SCORE ( ), DEC (Detroit Executive Service Corps) and the Collaborative of CEOS Detroit.

    Dick acquired an additional degree that led to academic teaching in Miami (Ohio) University where he also sits on the Comparative Religion Alumni Advisory Board. He and his wife established a Scholarship for Miami (OH) students. He draws upon his teaching and training experience to provide transition coaching for seniors in his community. Dick is the WG’65 Class Correspondent for the Wharton Magazine.

    Russell Redenbaugh, WG’69 (Glen Mills, PA)

    Russell built a successful career as a registered investment advisor. He did this while overcoming barrier set implicitly for someone who is sight impaired. Appointed as a Commissioner of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission for 15 years under three U.S. Presidents.

    Russell created a Foundation devoted to inspiring other to shift their self-limiting narratives. It was design to help people see and overcome where they are being (and have been) a victim, especially an unconscious victim. “My own life informs us that we can be much more than we ever imagined. It takes faith, but it takes faith in the possibilities of everything we are as humans. It takes believing in oneself and shifting one’s narrative away from “I can’t” to “I will.” And most of all, it takes the encouragement, development, and cultivation of better habits and the willingness to abandon habits and ways of thinking that are not useful. That is the significance and benefits of what I do.

    To that effect, in 2013 I shared my story and learnings about how one can “shift their narrative” in a TED talk followed by the 2017 publishing of my memoir “Shift the Narrative: A Blind Man’s Vision for Rewriting the Stories that Limit Us. The book “Shift the narrative” is available on Amazon”

    Jerry Rothstein, WG’65 (New York City)

    Personally involved in a number diverse community and international efforts that utilize his professional talents and energies. They include: American Red Cross of Greater New York, CCNY Student Mentor, United Jewish Appeal (Finance/ Soviet Committee), National School Climate Center, PennPac, CFA Institute, Big Apple Greeter

    William Sands, WG’66. (St. Paul, Mn)

    Bill is involved in the Neighborhood Development Centers (NDC) established for residents and neighborhood groups of all communities to have the talent, energy and ideas to develop and revitalize their own neighborhoods through entrepreneurship. They do this through four integrated programs: *Entrepreneur Training; Small Busi ness Lending and financing; Technical Assistance and Business Incubators. NDC has initiated the “Build from Within Alliance” with organizations across the country who are adopting and adapting the NDC model. Together with his wife Susan, Bill has funder the Sands Family Social Venturing Fellowship for Carlson School of Management Students at the University of Minnesota.

    Len Rothman, WEG67 (Roswell,GA)

    Professionally, Len was a ‘coach’ to a large number of organizational and systems managers. In retirement, he has been active as a volunteer for the United States Tennis Association working to increase the diversity of their membership both in the 9 southeastern states and at the national level of USTA. Given the history and current makeup of tennis championships, this is an important goal for the US Tennis Association.

    Guillermo Schmidhuber, WG’71 (Guadalajara, Mexico)

    Guillermo was professor at the University of Louisville, the University of Kentucky and the University of Guadalajara, the second largest university in Mexico. He lives Guadalajara, Mexico, where he continues writing plays. He also served as Secretary of Culture of the State of Jalisco, where he supported several UNESCO projects supporting world heritage sites in Jalisco, including the discovery of the Teuchitlán site, which turned out to be the oldest pre-Columbian culture of Western Mexico

    While Secretary of Culture of the State of Jalisco, he supported several UNESCO projects supporting world heritage sites in Jalisco, including the discovery of the Teuchitlán site, which turned out to be the oldest pre-Columbian culture of Western Mexico. He helped discover two previously lost texts of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz; one of them, The Second Celestina, was published with a prologue by Octavio Paz.

    A playwright, his most notable plays included: “Obituary”, “The Useless Heroes”, “The Heirs of Segismund”, “The Secret Friendship of Juana and Dorothy”, and “Never Say Adiós to Columbus”. My novel “Women of the Tequila Volcano” was published simultaneously in Argentina and Mexico. He has published several books on the history of Mexico. As a playwright, I he has written fifty plays for which he has received prizes. Several plays have been translated into German, French and English. His books and plays are available on Amazon.

    Milt Silver, WG’52 (Huntington Valley, PA)

    It is hard to define the line between Milt’s role as a faculty member of Drexel University, where he served as Department Head of Management, and his ‘retirement’, to which he continued devoting his experience, knowledge and energy in developing and mentoring entrepreneurs. His focus is not only within Drexel University, but also within the Wharton Graduate Program. In recent years this has focused on technical startups both local in Philadelphia, as well as nationally and even internationally. He is also a leader in Drexel’s collaborative initiative. All of this was undertaken while volunteering as a Board member of his synagogue, coaching tennis and Little League baseball. Milt is also a founding member of the Wharton Graduate Emeritus Society, serving on the WGES Steering committee since its inception.

    John (Jack) Smith, WG’52 (Lafayette Hill, PA)

    When attending a Wharton Graduate Reunion Luncheon between 1998 and 2002, you’d undoubtedly find Jack Smith meeting informally with the 50 year Class. He loved a good time, but also had something on his mind — spreading the world about the ‘tea’ principle.

    His focus: MBA’s 50 years out have acquired so much talent, experience and accomplishment, it’s a terrible waste to put them “out to pasture.’” Both Wharton and Senior Alumni could benefit by creating a vehicle to increase contact and turn close relationships into good works Thanks to Jack, the result was the Wharton Graduate Emeritus Society (WGES), established in 2003. As our initial Chair of the WGES Steering committee, Jack helped shaped and guide the Society as it grew in programs, activities and membership.

    Jack was dedicated and caring, full of good ideas, and had a love of Penn and Wharton. He was a strong mentor and contributor. Everyone involved in WGES had the good fortunate to work with Jack in building the unique Society and strengthening Wharton continually.

    William G (Bill) Staton, WG’71 (Charlotte, NC)

    Bill has focused his professional knowledge and experience in two major ways:
    1. Impart financial planning for life to teens by teaching them in local schools for over 25 years.
    2. Teaching inmates skills to be entrepreneurs in the business community —VERY UNIQUE: preparing prison inmates (male & female) for the transition back to domestic life. This is a very critical area. His work was written up in a Wall Street Journal article on August 23, 2012. (“On Financial Literacy for Inmates”)Bill has authored a number of books on money matters for the average person. They are available on Amazon.

    Elli Streit, WG’65 (Tel Aviv, Israel)

    Elli has volunteered with several NGOS in Israel ranging from museums, Tel Aviv University, two pharmaceuticals and sport organizations where his involvement as a board member focused mainly in financial management and fund raising. His membership in Rotary club of Tel Aviv involved raising money for granting scholarships to diverse students who needed financial assistance to complete their academics studies.

    He served 6 years as a member of Wharton Executive Board where he contributed his international experience in expanding Wharton international alumni clubs. He was involved in setting up the Israeli alumni club and was part of its management team for many years. He was one of the donors to the recently established scholarship fund to support Israeli MBA candidates.

    Since Israel is known as one of the Silicon Valley-type tech startup countries, Elli’s main volunteer efforts has been sharing extensive business experience with entrepreneurs helping start up founders avoid mistakes and become more focused on what is really relevant to the growth of their companies. Serving on boards of several healthcare firms gave him the opportunity to participate in bringing to patents new solutions and better treatment.

    Elli notes that “Leadership in any business or voluntary organization becomes more effective when it is based on knowing how to motivate people by self example and being always aware that at the end it is the team efforts which push the company/NGO forward”

    Gene Stricjkand, WG’66 (Lakeland, FL)

    After 34 years as Lakeland FL city manager, Gene has promoted affordable housing projects in his community. He also has provided leadership in the Boy and Girls clubs of Lakeland and Mulberry, FL and served as a Trustee of the Lakeland Employees and Fire Fighters Pension . Funds. Gene has also been a Board Member and volunteer for ACE (the Aerospace Center for Excellence.)

    • Robert Swartz, WG’67 (Reston, VA)
      Bob has focused volunteer activities in six areas:
    • As a NPS (National Park Service) Volunteer for the National Mall & Memorial Parks in DC, primarily the Vietnam Veterans and the WWII Memorials.
    • As a Hospitality Group volunteer for the Wolf Trap Performing Arts concerts and programs.
    • A Member of the Reston (VA) Association’s Fiscal Committee
    • Financial Advisor Board of VHB that provides linguists to the Federal government particular for the Middle East (e.g. Afghanistan.).
    • He is also a Financial Advisor for Quest Digital Interactive which is developing a software game: “Saving the Planet.”
    • Collaboration with Tony Gallo on a play about Robert Morris, Financier of the America Revolution.

    Shigeo Suzuki, WG’71, (Tokyo, Japan)

    I’ve been a managing director of English Speaking Union of Japan(ESUJ), NPO affiliated with Ministry of Foreign Affairs for more than a decade. It’s objective is to foster globally minded young ones for better international communications, ESUJ has been organizing and sponsoring all Japan inter-collegiate, then, inter- high school English debate contests annually, which has been participated each time by more than 120 schools and 500 students including local heats.

    I was the judge first and now the producer and head of the contest. Another important job is to select and send annually the young Japanese representative for the prestigious International Public Speech Contest( IPSC) in London.I’ve been the judge and give training for the selected Japanese representative student. I have introduced English parliamentary debate method for Japanese students for the first time to improve their negotiation skills.Thanks to ESUJ’s effort to promote English debate as a tool to improve international communication skill for Japanese young ones, the Ministry of Education realized it’s importance and has added English debate as mandatory new subject to learn at all middle and high schools from this year 2022.

    Robert Swartz, WG’67 (Reston, VA)

    Bob has focused volunteer activities in six areas:
    1. As a NPS (National Park Service) Volunteer for the National Mall & Memorial Parks in DC, primarily the Vietnam Veterans and the WWII Memorials.
    2. As a Hospitality Group volunteer for the Wolf Trap Performing Arts concerts and programs.
    3. A Member of the Reston (VA) Association’s Fiscal Committee
    4. Financial Advisor Board of VHB that provides linguists to the Federal government particular for the Middle East (e.g. Afghanistan.).
    5. He is also a Financial Advisor for Quest Digital Interactive which is developing a software game: “Saving the Planet.”
    6. Collaboration with Tony Gallo on a play about Robert Morris, Financier of the American Revolution.

    Richard Tecca, WG’58 (Hebron, CT)

    Richard’s volunteer work devoted to strengthen the arts and culture of his community began early in his professional career (1965) when he organized and direct a 70 voice volunteer ‘Collegiate Choir’ at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter & Paul in Philadelphia, where he was served a Director of Music. This choir, now renamed The Adult Cathedral Choir, celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2014.

    Later in his career, when he worked in Connecticut and on into his ‘retirement’, he was a participant and active in two well-known and established choral groups:

    • The Hartford Chorale: Founded in 1972, the Hartford Chorale is a volunteer not-for-profit organization that presents masterpieces of great choral art on a symphonic scale for listeners throughout Southern New England. In addition singing with the chorale, Dick has served as Vice-President and a Member of the Governance Committee for several years.
    • Connecticut Gilbert & Sullivan Society which has presented annual shows of Gilbert & Sullivan’s comic operates in Connecticut since 1981. In addition, to be a member of the cast each year in their performances, Dick served on the Society’s board and managed their Marketing program.

    Christian Varin, WG’70 (Switzerland)


    Richard Veith, WG’65 (Devon, PA)

    Early his career, and on into his “retirement” Dick and his wife Carolyn have been very active in the International House of Philadelphia (IHP) which houses foreign students for Penn and other Philadelphia colleges and universities. This involved being a volunteer for the AFS exchange student Chapter in Philadelphia. After years of ‘hosting’ students, Dick was recruited to be a member of the IHP’s Board of Trustees where he served as Board Treasurer for many years.

    Dick’s first experience with a being a Board member of a nonprofit in the Philadelphia area was the Boys & Girls Club of Philadelphia (BGCP). Initially, he served on the Financial Committee but subsequently he was BGCP’s Board Chair from which he spearheaded several successful capital gifting campaigns. Under his leadership, the Jeremiah Milbank Society, which enrolls individuals making contributions of $10,000 for BGCP. Jeremiah Milbank was one of the founders of the Boys & Girls Club in America.

    Since the early 1080s, Dick has been active with Tredyffrin Township where he lives. He was Elected Township Auditor which he serves for several years.

    Mike Wallace, WG’65 (Paris and Laos)

    Mike created a foundation that funds scholarships to students for Laos-American College; mentors graduates and supports their career development; innovates with startups and business plans — international. Since 2010, lives in Laos 10 months a year, running a nonprofit that helps educate children and encourages would be entrepreneurs to develop small businesses

    Sponsoring students from poor rural areas includes school fees, books, food, health-care and even sleeping accommodations to Lao-American College in Vietnane.

    Mike meets the criteria for a Crandall Challenge — high level of commitment and personal involvement. Translates into involving any others and focuses on impacting the business economy and community in Laos. Provides tangible results in terms of students who are involved, graduate and become an important element of the development of Laos a part of the wide world economy.

    Alfred Whelan, WG’73 ( Rockville, MD)

    Alfred conducts Workshops at Montgomery College in Rockville, MD. The objective is to assist students with resume development and interviewing skills. Many of these students are from foreign countries, with limited English language skills. The majority are trying to transition into careers in technology from previous experience outside that industry.

    Jerry Wilkinson, WG’69 (Atlanta, GA)

    Provided time and support to the local and national apartment industry associations and community foundation in Atlanta. Jerry has served in several leadership positions for the National Apartment Association and the Atlanta and Georgia Apartment Associations, along with being a Board members of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the Atlanta Community Food Bank. Duke University’s New School of Engineering has been names in honor of Jerry and his Family’s long time support.

    Nedland Williams, WG’76 (Marblehead, MA)

    Proposed in a broad brush, big picture way a revamp of the U.S. tax code.
    Wrote and published a 2010 book, Fixing Everything, on Amazon. This dealt with many of the issues plaguing the federal government and proposed solutions.

    Proposed a new tax code. We currently waste 7.6 billion man-hours on federal tax compliance. A new code could reduce that to 2 billion, or 2% additional growth to the economy. The core idea would be a flat tax combined with a UBI. Companies would be the tax collectors, while the UBI would add progressivism and could be distributed separately.

    The UBI would cost $2.5 trillion (citizens would receive the Federal Poverty Level). This could be paid for with tax expenditures [$1.6 trillion] and some safety-net [$0.9 trillion of $2.0 trillion]. The safety-net reductions would be dollar-for-dollar exchange. Since the UBI would not be means-tested, there would be less disincentive to work. Better economics decisions would be made. With the above in place, we could fix Social Security, annual federal spending, reduce crime, fix our healthcare system, and several others.

    Brad Woolsey, WG’72, (Kentfield, CA)

    Following a 30 year career as owner and founder of Parallax Marketing, an opportunity seeking business that worked nationally and internationally to introduce new products into the economy, Brad devoted his “retirement’ to a wide range community efforts: devising and successfully marketing a parcel tax for California School Boards; coaching a range of different youth sports teams for his community; fund raising for Whittier College, where he also served on the Board of Trustees. Brad was also part of the Penn Alumni Interview Program for 10 years covering Marin, Sonoma and Contra Costa counties of California. He also volunteered for the Shanti Project which provided caregiving services to AIDS patients; and also volunteers for efforts that support the San Francisco Opera and Symphony.

    Paul Zantzinger, WG’67 (Marietta, GA)

    Prepares and serves food to addicts.
    Trinity House, Atlanta, GA. tcmatlanta.org Preparing and serving food and prayer to recovering addicts. Helping addicts is very challenging because there is a high degree of relapse.

    I am helping one human being at a time, to recovery. I cannot help everybody but if I can help one individual to recover, and even if they stumble and fall, I can encourage them get up and walk forward. It is important to have facilities such as Trinity House to help individuals in need to find recovery, love and understanding.

    Harvey Jay Zukerman, WG’63 (Los Angeles, CA)

    Harvey is a volunteer docent for the Getty Center in Lo Angeles. He primarily leads students, Kindergarten thru Grade 12. It was a natural devotion on his part since his wife is an artist. He reflects the traditional way in which most WGES members participate in the “Geezer Crusade.” Following ‘retirement”, they select on institution and devote their time and energy to that institution: it generally is a cultural, medical, sports, religious institution in their community and region. These volunteers are vital for all of these institutions.

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